holi

animationtidbits:

How to Draw the Head from Any Angle

Additional tutorials:
Head Any Angle (Video)
Eyes - http://bit.ly/draweyes
Nose - http://bit.ly/drawnose
Lips - http://bit.ly/drawlips
Ears - http://bit.ly/drawears
Hair - http://bit.ly/drawhair

You may get asked this a lot, so please excuse my ignorance - but how do you go about constructing character expressions and body language and such? Thanks!

makanidotdot:

Besides The Basics (construction of heads and skulls and muscles and skeletons and how they move), I’ll go over some things I’ve been trying to work on myself lately:

1. Treat expressions as a single gesture of the face/head, as opposed to a head and then individual features dumped on a plate and arranged into an expression.

First, just get down the big shapes of your expression, just like you would for a pose.  

So say I wanna do a low angle angry pose.  I know the features are gonna be all mashed down at the bottom because of perspective.

 Scribble it down

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start to put on features

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fix stuff

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put on more stuff

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fix stuff again

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erasing and flipping and stuff a whole bunch until you are happy with it or stop caring

Whole head is a gesture!image

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2. Just like a facial expression, jot down where the important parts of an entire pose goes first.  You can force the rest of the body to fit the pose.

So here I knew I wanted the shoulders tilted a certain direction, and te hand to be in that particular position in front of her face. 

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That’s the simplest explanation I got.  Don’t be afraid to push and pull faces and bodies around! Worry about being “on model” last!

Basic checklist for your story

the-right-writing:

This checklist can be used during both planning and editing stages.

Your Protagonist

  • Does your protagonist have a personality beyond being heroic and nice?
  • Does your protagonist have agency?
  • Does your protagonist’s personality change?
  • Did your protagonist have a life and relationships before the events of the story?
  • Does your protagonist have flaws?
  • Is your protagonist active as opposed to passive or reactive?

Your Setting

  • Is your setting described well enough that readers can imagine themselves there?
  • Is your setting used or described differently than similar settings by other authors?
  • Do readers have a sense that your world extends outside the events of your story?
  • Does your setting have its own unique atmosphere aside from being a backdrop for your plot?
  • Is it important that the events in your story take place in this setting and not another?

Your Romantic Subplot/Plot (if applicable)

  • Does the relationship have flaws?
  • Does the relationship take time to develop?
  • Does the love interest have their own personality beyond their romantic traits?
  • Does the love interest have agency both inside and outside the relationship?
  • Does the love interest have flaws?

Your Major Non-Protagonist Characters

  • Do your major characters have varying opinions on your protagonist?
  • Do your major characters have traits outside of their relationships with the protagonist?
  • Do your major characters have varying gender identities, races, ability statuses, and sexual orientations, unless there is a good plot reason otherwise (such as the story taking place mainly at a male prison or a gay bar)?
  • Do your major characters have different worldviews and senses of morality?
  • Do most of your major characters have agency?
  • Do your major characters have flaws?
  • Do all of your major characters need to be there?
  • Do most of your major characters’ personalities change?

Your Minor and Background Characters

  • Do most of your minor characters have something that makes them interesting and memorable?
  • Do your minor characters have varying gender identities, races, ability statuses, and sexual orientations, unless there is a good plot reason otherwise (such as the story taking place mainly at a male prison or a gay bar)?
  • Do all of your minor characters need to be there?

Your Antagonist

  • Does your antagonist have a reasonable motive for their actions?
  • Does your antagonist have agency?
  • Has your antagonist done enough to be taken seriously?
  • Does your antagonist have good traits?
  • Does your antagonist have traits outside of their relationship with the protagonist?

Your Plot

  • Do your scenes flow logically?
  • Are all of your questions either answered or left unanswered for a reason?
  • Are there too many coincidences?
  • Does your plot begin at the perfect spot?
  • Does your plot end at the perfect spot?
  • Is there conflict?
  • Are there any scenes that could be left out?
  • Does your plot happen because of the actions, reactions, and decisions of your characters?

Your Mechanics

  • Are there any spelling or grammatical errors?
  • Are there any sentences that could be left out?
  • Are most of your sentences active instead of passive?
  • Do you use mostly strong verbs (ex: drank, ran) instead of weak verbs (ex: was, did)?
  • Do you use too many adverbs?
  • Are your sentences varied in structure?

roleplay-911:

ROLEPLAYING RELATIONSHIPS 

No one ship is exactly the same. Each couple tends to come with their own quirks, their own traditions, their own struggles.

I’ve recently dug up an interesting article that categorizes relationships into 10 different kinds.

  1. Survival relationships 
  2. Validation relationships 
  3. Scripted relationships 
  4. Acceptance relationships
  5. Individuation-Assertion relationships 
  6. Healing relationships 
  7. Experimental relationships 
  8. Transitional relationships
  9. Avoidance relationships
  10. Pastime relationships  

If you’re interested in using these to help you roleplay a relationship that seems in at least some way, realistic, continue reading. 

Survival relationships: 

  • This is made up of people who don’t feel as if they can survive on their own. 
  • They feel as if they have to have someone be anything. In some cases it may literally be a case of survival.
  • Think someone who provides shelter, food, job, money etc. It’s important to note that these two are codependent. 
  • The relationship is often hostile and sometimes abusive. 
  • Feelings of insecurity tend to run rampant! 

Validation relationships: 

  • People in these relationships are those who seek validation of their physical attractiveness, intellect, social status, sexuality, wealth, or some other attribute.  
  • Teenagers and young adults who are looking for a sense of identity form relationships based on sexual validation.
  • The relationship tends to be a little insecure and need constant validation. 
  • “Do you really love me?” 

Scripted relationships: 

  • Seems to be the most perfect of relationships and everyone around them sees it as a great relationship.
  • The partners are the most perfect boyfriend or the most perfect girlfriend.
  • There are often power struggles in this type of relationship.
  • Sexual attraction or involvement if often lacking.
  • The partners are often stuck in routines. 

Acceptance relationships 

  • A trusting, supporting and enjoyable relationship. 
  • A very healthy and happy relationship. 

Individuation-Assertion relationships 

  • Both individuals know what the others wants and needs are.
  • Respect is a key factor in this relationship.
  • Partners are supportive of others aspirations and dreams 
  • They both recognize their individuality. 

NOTE: All types from here on tend to be transient.

Healing relationships:

  • These occur after periods of loss, struggle, depression, stress or mourning.
  • They’re looking for someone to “fix them” 
  • Couples tend to talk about the past and their losses a lot. 
  • Gentleness, support, and comfort  characterize this relationship srather than great passion.

Experimental relationships 

  • These are experimental relationships.

Transitional relationships 

  • This is a relationship that is a cross between the kind of relationships you use to have the kind you want.
  • An “almost but not quite there” 

Avoidance relationships 

  • They’re together but not close.
  • They want to avoid their own deeper feelings. 
  • Don’t want to “get too close” 
  • Self-disclosure is low and mistrust is high. 

Pastime relationships 

  • Just something recreational and for fun and games.
  • Often emphasis is on fun and not deeper feelings.
  • Not one likely to last.
  • One night stands fall under this.

(A link to the article

merps:

fileextension:

here ill post these together!! luv this water brush

Because this didn’t come in my SAI and I bet it didn’t with other people’s, here’s a pack of more textures (including the lava one!!!). Go to your SAI folder and just dump the ones you’d like in the brushtex folder (or w/e you have it called)

Time travel masterpost?

characterandwritinghelp:

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INSIDE THIS VERY LONG POST: Everything Headless has on time travel, including time travel theories, worldbuilding provisions, paradoxes and hypotheses, and other considerations (as brought to you by someone who knows absolutely nothing about science, physics, or time travel).

Let’s Do The Time Warp (Or Something)

Time travel is awesome.

Read More